OBS Executive Director

OBS Executive Director

Overview

The Organization for Black Struggle (OBS) is seeking an Executive Director. We seek an experienced and dynamic executive leader who, in partnership with members, board and staff, will be prepared to carry forward and build on OBS’ 41-year history of multi-issue organizing for Black liberation in the St. Louis region. We are looking for a skilled manager, with a background in movement organizing, who will be able to provide dynamic leadership and direction for OBS. The Executive Director will oversee operations of OBS to ensure the organization’s financial stability, the quality of its strategic campaigns and programs, the building of a strong membership base, the development of community leaders, and the maintenance of its relationships with key stakeholders.

Qualifications

The Executive Director will advance the work of the Organization for Black Struggle through the following basic Responsibilities:

Organizing, Advocacy, and Program Leadership

Resource Development

Organizational Development and Management:

Communications

Compensation & Benefits

This is a full-time, salaried position with some travel. Competitive benefits package is available, including medical, dental, vacation and sick leave. Salary range is $65,000-$70,000 and based upon experience.

Contact Information

Send a cover letter, three references, and a resume to contactus@obs-stl.org with “Executive Director Job Position” in the subject line. Please, no phone calls.

OBS is an equal opportunity employer and strongly encourages applications from people of color, people with disabilities, women, and LGBTQIA applicants.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

Program Support Assistant

Program Support Assistant

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice. This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Responsibilities

Necessary Skills and Qualifications

Education and Experience

Terms of Employment

This is a part-time position (15-20 hours a week). Salary is at $15-$20 per hour based upon skills and experience. Some evening and weekend hours may be required. This is an excellent job opportunity for a grad student or a young-at-heart retiree.

To Apply

E‐mail cover letter and resume to contactus@obs-stl.org, add “Program Support Assistant” in the subject line. No phone calls, please.

The Organization for Black Struggle is an equal opportunity employer. People of color, women and LGBTQAI persons are strongly encouraged to apply.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

OBS Youth Organizer

OBS Youth Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. We are building a movement that fights for political power, economic justice and the cultural dignity for the Black working class. We envision a society free of all forms of economic exploitation and oppression.

General Staff Expectations

Skills and Qualifications

Compensation & Benefits

OBS youth organizer would be paid $15-$20 per hour depending on demonstrated organizing experience. This is a part-time position that could develop into a full-time position.

Contact Information

Please send a cover letter that speaks to how your skills and experiences connect with the position. Include three references of people who have worked with you and who are familiar with your work experience, such as a supervisor. Send cover letter and a resume to contactus@obs-stl.org.

OBS is an equal opportunity employer and strongly encourages applications from people of color, people with disabilities, women, and LGBT applicants.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

How to be an Activist (Online Workshop)

How to be an Activist (Online Workshop)

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Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

The Organization for Black Struggle (OBS)Demands Justice for the St. Louis Justice Center Residents Subjected to Inhumane Conditions

The Organization for Black Struggle (OBS)Demands Justice for the St. Louis Justice Center Residents Subjected to Inhumane Conditions

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For Immediate ReleaseFebruary 8, 2021

Contact Person: Azizi Blissett (314.367.5959)

The insurrection that occurred on Saturday, February 6 at the St. Louis Justice Center in response to COVID-19 has been boiling for almost a year. The prolonged neglect by city officials starting with Mayor Lyda Krewson and Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards is unconscionable and unacceptable. OBS must always remind the public that the city jail and the workhouse are holding facilities until citizens are arraigned and charged. They are innocent until proven guilty.

Last summer, the Organization for Black Struggle began getting calls from inmates who were confined to the St. Louis City and County jails. There were growing concerns about the pandemic and whether these institutions were following CDC guidelines to ensure the safety of both residents and staff. OBS reached out to the directors of both facilities to provide testing through Affinia Healthcare who was committed to sending its mobile units out.On June 29, OBS held a press conference to announce its efforts to get inmates tested at these facilities. We reported that the County used its own Department of Health to perform the COVID-19 tests but that city jail officials were unresponsive.

The new year began with OBS again receiving calls and emails from family members whose loved ones were confined to the Justice Center. We were informed that a guard had been taken hostage and inmates were protesting conditions in the jail that was potentially spreading the deadly virus. On January 1, OBS held a press conference in front of the St. Louis City Justice Center to report what was going on inside the facility. We implored the mayor to investigate and take appropriate actions to maintain order and the safety of parties. Subsequently, we requested a number of documents relative to the incident through the Sunshine Act. To date, no documents have been received.

It was no surprise when we received early morning calls on February 6 that inmates had taken over the fourth floor of the facility, knocking out windows for better visibility and begging for relief. The uprising made national news, once again projecting the city’s racist views in policy and practice. It was also clear that nothing had been done in the last 30 days to rectify the housing situation. Retaliation by staff since the weekend incident have further put the health and safety at risk of those entrusted to their care. It is reported that inmates are being forced to sleep on the floor, some in the cold water left from the fire department putting out fires which had been set. Others have been without food and water for two days.

These incidents underscore the incompetence and indifference of the Krewson administration. The lack of resolution is only escalating the tensions inside. The situation is grave and demands immediate action. We ask the citizens of St. Louis to demand the mayor cease and desist the litany of lies coming out about the situation. The conditions require a committed approach to a healthy and human resolution.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org