St. Louis Mayoral Candidates Forum with Tishaura Jones

St. Louis Mayoral Candidates Forum with Tishaura Jones

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Sat. March 27, 2021 Noon CST

The St. Louis Community Justice Coalition (CJC) is hosting its second mayoral forum for the two candidates who received the votes necessary to advance to the April 6 General Election. This mayoral forum will focus on public safety and the St. Louis departments responsible for ensuring fairness and safety of all our citizens.

Tishaura Jones

Community Justice Coalition Members, organizations listed for identification purposes only:

Rev. Dr. Linden Bowie, Missionary Baptist State Convention of Missouri • Rev. Dr. Spencer Lamar Booker, Social Action Commission of The Afri-can Methodist Episcopal Church • Reverend Darryl Gray, Social Justice Commission, Progressive Missionary Baptist State Convention • Jay Ozier & Lew Moye, Coalition of Black Trade Unionist • Jamala Rogers, Organization for Black Struggle • Walle Amusa, Campaign for Respect, Fairness and Human Dignity • Willie Boyd, End Mass Incarceration • Amir Brandy, RealStlNews / Peacekeepers • Zaki Baruti, The Universal African Peoples Organization • Jerryl Christmas, Attorney at Law • Martha West, Community Block Unit #302 • Carol Jackson, Pashon Consulting, Inc.

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OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

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“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

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Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

Revisiting Gary 1972: Re-energizing the Movement for Black Political Power in 2021

Revisiting Gary 1972: Re-energizing the Movement for Black Political Power in 2021

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The National Black Political Convention was a critical milestone in the struggle for Black political power. Members of the Congress of African People played a key role in organizing for the convention as well as for the assemblies around the Black agenda that followed. This panel will explore the need for a renewed call for a national political agenda, learning from the lessons of Gary and other subsequent gatherings.

Rukia Lumumba

People’s Advocacy Institute & Movement for Black Lives

Taalamu Holiday

CAP veteran organizer for the Gary convention

Larry Hamm

People's Organization for Progress (POP) in NJ

Kelly Harris

Africana Studies Department, Seton Hall University

Rev. Estelle (Akiba) David

CAP veteran who staffed the Gary convention

For more info, email us at congressofafricanpeople50@gmail.com.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

OBS Executive Director

OBS Executive Director

Overview

The Organization for Black Struggle (OBS) is seeking an Executive Director. We seek an experienced and dynamic executive leader who, in partnership with members, board and staff, will be prepared to carry forward and build on OBS’ 41-year history of multi-issue organizing for Black liberation in the St. Louis region. We are looking for a skilled manager, with a background in movement organizing, who will be able to provide dynamic leadership and direction for OBS. The Executive Director will oversee operations of OBS to ensure the organization’s financial stability, the quality of its strategic campaigns and programs, the building of a strong membership base, the development of community leaders, and the maintenance of its relationships with key stakeholders.

Qualifications

The Executive Director will advance the work of the Organization for Black Struggle through the following basic Responsibilities:

Organizing, Advocacy, and Program Leadership

Resource Development

Organizational Development and Management:

Communications

Compensation & Benefits

This is a full-time, salaried position with some travel. Competitive benefits package is available, including medical, dental, vacation and sick leave. Salary range is $65,000-$70,000 and based upon experience.

Contact Information

Send a cover letter, three references, and a resume to contactus@obs-stl.org with “Executive Director Job Position” in the subject line. Please, no phone calls.

OBS is an equal opportunity employer and strongly encourages applications from people of color, people with disabilities, women, and LGBTQIA applicants.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

Program Support Assistant

Program Support Assistant

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice. This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Responsibilities

Necessary Skills and Qualifications

Education and Experience

Terms of Employment

This is a part-time position (15-20 hours a week). Salary is at $15-$20 per hour based upon skills and experience. Some evening and weekend hours may be required. This is an excellent job opportunity for a grad student or a young-at-heart retiree.

To Apply

E‐mail cover letter and resume to contactus@obs-stl.org, add “Program Support Assistant” in the subject line. No phone calls, please.

The Organization for Black Struggle is an equal opportunity employer. People of color, women and LGBTQAI persons are strongly encouraged to apply.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

OBS Youth Organizer

OBS Youth Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. We are building a movement that fights for political power, economic justice and the cultural dignity for the Black working class. We envision a society free of all forms of economic exploitation and oppression.

General Staff Expectations

Skills and Qualifications

Compensation & Benefits

OBS youth organizer would be paid $15-$20 per hour depending on demonstrated organizing experience. This is a part-time position that could develop into a full-time position.

Contact Information

Please send a cover letter that speaks to how your skills and experiences connect with the position. Include three references of people who have worked with you and who are familiar with your work experience, such as a supervisor. Send cover letter and a resume to contactus@obs-stl.org.

OBS is an equal opportunity employer and strongly encourages applications from people of color, people with disabilities, women, and LGBT applicants.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

How to be an Activist (Online Workshop)

How to be an Activist (Online Workshop)

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Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

The Organization for Black Struggle (OBS)Demands Justice for the St. Louis Justice Center Residents Subjected to Inhumane Conditions

The Organization for Black Struggle (OBS)Demands Justice for the St. Louis Justice Center Residents Subjected to Inhumane Conditions

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For Immediate ReleaseFebruary 8, 2021

Contact Person: Azizi Blissett (314.367.5959)

The insurrection that occurred on Saturday, February 6 at the St. Louis Justice Center in response to COVID-19 has been boiling for almost a year. The prolonged neglect by city officials starting with Mayor Lyda Krewson and Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards is unconscionable and unacceptable. OBS must always remind the public that the city jail and the workhouse are holding facilities until citizens are arraigned and charged. They are innocent until proven guilty.

Last summer, the Organization for Black Struggle began getting calls from inmates who were confined to the St. Louis City and County jails. There were growing concerns about the pandemic and whether these institutions were following CDC guidelines to ensure the safety of both residents and staff. OBS reached out to the directors of both facilities to provide testing through Affinia Healthcare who was committed to sending its mobile units out.On June 29, OBS held a press conference to announce its efforts to get inmates tested at these facilities. We reported that the County used its own Department of Health to perform the COVID-19 tests but that city jail officials were unresponsive.

The new year began with OBS again receiving calls and emails from family members whose loved ones were confined to the Justice Center. We were informed that a guard had been taken hostage and inmates were protesting conditions in the jail that was potentially spreading the deadly virus. On January 1, OBS held a press conference in front of the St. Louis City Justice Center to report what was going on inside the facility. We implored the mayor to investigate and take appropriate actions to maintain order and the safety of parties. Subsequently, we requested a number of documents relative to the incident through the Sunshine Act. To date, no documents have been received.

It was no surprise when we received early morning calls on February 6 that inmates had taken over the fourth floor of the facility, knocking out windows for better visibility and begging for relief. The uprising made national news, once again projecting the city’s racist views in policy and practice. It was also clear that nothing had been done in the last 30 days to rectify the housing situation. Retaliation by staff since the weekend incident have further put the health and safety at risk of those entrusted to their care. It is reported that inmates are being forced to sleep on the floor, some in the cold water left from the fire department putting out fires which had been set. Others have been without food and water for two days.

These incidents underscore the incompetence and indifference of the Krewson administration. The lack of resolution is only escalating the tensions inside. The situation is grave and demands immediate action. We ask the citizens of St. Louis to demand the mayor cease and desist the litany of lies coming out about the situation. The conditions require a committed approach to a healthy and human resolution.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

“Never Been A Time” Virtual Screening and Discussion

“Never Been A Time” Virtual Screening and Discussion

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An important documentary which explores the roots and legacy of one of the worst civilian massacres in modern American history. Joining the discussion is local filmmaker Denise Ward-Brown and former alderman Terry Kennedy whose family was a survivor of the infamous massacre.

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

41st Anniversary Celebration – “Intensifying the Struggle for BlackPolitical Power & Self-Determination”

41st Anniversary Celebration – “Intensifying the Struggle for BlackPolitical Power & Self-Determination”

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The demand for black political power has been ever constant through the various movements–Black liberation,BLACK POWER, Black Lives Matter. This year, St. Louis is poised to elect a Black mayor. In 2023, the City will also reduce the number of alder people by half. New restricting maps will be created for the country based upon the 2020 Census. How will we guarantee racial equity and fair representation of African-Americans in the region? We must organize to ensure our communities are not further left behind!

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org

Screening of the First Rainbow Coalition’

Screening of the First Rainbow Coalition’

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The First Rainbow Coalition charts the history and legacy of a groundbreaking multi-racial coalition that rocked Chicago in the 1960s. Comprised of activists from the Black Panthers, the Young Patriots (southern whites), and the Young Lords (a former Puerto Rican street gang), this formation briefly united poor blacks, whites, and Latinos around common issues facing their communities before being destroyed by police sabotage. Building a strong, radical multiracial movement will be critical in a post-trump world. What lessons can we learn from the brothers and sisters who founded the first Rainbow Coalition.

FRIDAY December 4, 2020     7:00 pm CST

Recent Posts

OBS Racial Justice Organizer

The Organization for Black Struggle was founded in 1980 by community activists, students, workers’ rights organizers and others to address the burning issues confronting the African American community. We are a Black-led and member-driven organization. One of the foundational pillars of OBS is the important work around racial justice.This includes, but is not limited to, police accountability, mass incarceration, judicial reform and the death penalty.

Read More »

“This is what happens to us” Washington Post article on failed response by cities to COVID-19

Poor reporting of data, which initially masked the fact that the disease was disproportionately affecting black communities, remains a problem even as states move to reopen their economies.

Today, Americans living in counties with above-average black populations are three times as likely to die of the coronavirus as those in above-average white counties, according to an analysis of census and other data by The Washington Post.

Read More »

Sign up for Updates

Organization for Black Struggle
P.O. Box 5277
St. Louis, MO 63115
(314) 367-5959 | contactus@obs-stl.org